Boland Dorp by François Krige

The final image in this collection represents a Krige ideal. The platteland dorps of his childhood and youth constituted a paradisiacal realm, one that he returned to in the last decades of his life when he settled in Montagu. His many village drawings suggest a deep affection for such environments: vernacular architecture, established trees and […]

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Rakops, Botswana by François Krige

It is likely that during as many as three of Krige’s expe­ditions to Botswana (1960, 1962 and 1972) he stayed with the Barakwena people. This is a San clan (also know as the River Bushmen) from northern Botswana who, apart from hunting and gathering, also practice fishing and keep livestock. They utilise both forest and […]

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Paternoster by François Krige

Krige travelled the length of the Western Cape coastline and was especially drawn to traditional fishing villages. We see sailing craft, genre scenes of men repairing nets, boat-builders at work and wrecked vessels washed up on the beach. In 1951 he visited Paternoster and was so enchanted by it that he decided to remain there […]

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Constantia Valley by François Krige

After the war, Krige again stayed with his parents intermittently. They had moved from the Free State to the Cape and were now renting a house from Con Cloete (of Groot Constantia and Alphen fame) on Pagasvlei Road in Constantia. From there, Krige made daily sketching excursions – often by bicycle – round the peninsula […]

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Basotho Men by François Krige

In 1937 Krige’s family moved to Bethlehem in the Free State, where they remained for the rest of the decade. Although now based in Johannesburg, the artist made frequent trips to visit his parents and explore the region. He loved hiking in the mountains of what was then Basutoland (Lesotho). There are many works from […]

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Market, Spain by François Krige

Spain captivated Krige. When the artist joined his brother Uys there in 1934, the poet plunged him into the Iberian way of life, infecting him with a love of things Spanish. At this time, François was training his eye and hand to respond almost instinctively to the subject matter. The learning curve during his period […]

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